This post was originally found on XBMC.org.

In a continuation of the series begun with our write-up of the USB-CEC adapter, we would like to take the time today to highlight another adapter out there that makes controlling XBMC dramatically easier. This week, I’d like to introduce Chris (psuedo7 in the forum), who will be telling us a bit about the project FLIRC.  I’d also like to invite any other software writers or manufacturers to contact me in the forums at username natethomas, if you have come up with a new and unique method for improving the usability of XBMC and would like to share your project.

Take it away, Chris.

Hello XBMC.org Readers,

My name is Chris (or pseudo7 on the forums). I’ve been an XBMC user for about 3 years, firstly using my mac then using a shuttle box running Openelec (so I didn’t have to keep connecting/ disconnecting my MacBook Pro).  I love XBMC: the application, the project and everything it envelops.

(Disclaimer – whilst I am “staff” (Read: a forum moderator) on the FLIRC forums I am not employed by Flirc and do not benefit directly, financially or otherwise, from the project I am about to discuss.)

I have recently come across a product which has enhanced my XBMC experience, and I wanted to give back to the community and share my findings about Flirc.

Much like the previous Pulse-Eight article, my intention is to highlight what I think is a great product that many users may not have heard about that dramatically simplifies the process of building an XBMC htpc.

What is Flirc?

Flirc allows you to pair your same television remote to your computer with easy one-time setup software.

Flirc is a small USB infra-red (I.R.) adapter that receives I.R. commands from a remote control.

the_flirc_adapter

However, Flirc is different from other I.R. adapters. Conventionally, I.R. adapters require the computer to understand I.R. commands, which is what LIRC is for. However, methods like LIRC require extensive knowledge should your remote control not be supported, which can be more frequent than expected. LIRC is not meant for the novice. (I am not trying to bad mouth the hard work on remote support by LIRC devs – just stating my opinion and experience.)

That’s where Flirc steps in. Flirc is detected as a USB keyboard, eliminating the need for XBMC special drivers. Any media center application that supports a keyboard as an input device supports Flirc out of the box.

Programming Flirc is easy to do, but ironically rather hard to explain so I’ve made a video:

(Bonus points if you guess what the video playing in XBMC is.)

Flirc has also made a video explaining the steps to program the Flirc device.

Flirc + XBMC = Happiness

XBMC has many great functions, and not being able to control those functions can be a huge kick in the teeth. You can access every XBMC user function using keyboard presses (which is not always the case with a standard LIRC controlled remote), so if your remote could do keyboard presses you would have loads more control.

Flirc takes the I.R. signals from your regular old remote and sends those signals to the computer as keyboard presses… perfect non?

Flirc supports nearly every remote (see the section on current Flirc limitations below) and XBMC supports nearly every platform. So Flirc aims to make your remote work with your XBMC install on any computer that supports USB keyboards. Flirc is even supported on the Xbox 360 after previously being paired with a computer running Windows, Linux, or OSX.

Flirc can store 160 keys. The possibilities are great. For example, the off button on a remote could be mapped to the key combination Alt+F4. Thereafter, when you press the off button on the remote, Flirc will always send ALT+F4 to the computer.

Who Makes Flirc?

Flirc was set up by Jason Kotzin and his wife Maggie. It is a small company of which Jason is the only coder. For more about Flirc visit http://www.flirc.tv/about_us/

Current Flirc Limitations

All young projects have their niggles, and Flirc is no different.

Unfortunately, MCE remotes, which are quite prevalent amongst XBMC users, don’t work as well as they should and are best avoided at the moment. At a very basic level (which is my understanding of it) MCE remotes emit non-standard I.R. frequencies (about 56Khz), with standard frequencies being 38Khz. For more in-depth discussion on this issue please visit the MCE topic on the Flirc forum. This issue is still being worked on, but new features for existing remotes are being added first.

Conversely, remotes such as the Logitech Harmony series work very well with Flirc. Best results have been achieved by programming remotes profiles intended for TV’s onto your Harmony remote using a different brand than the TV the users actually has, so the TV doesn’t recognize the command intended for the htpc.

The Golden Lining

A portion of every sale goes to the USC Cancer Research center that Jason’s oncologists leads and where Jason underwent chemotherapy. Every sale of Flirc results in a donation to the charity. Jason would like to report back to XBMC users how much they have contributed to the charity, so please use discount code “XBMC” (without quotes) when you purchase to allow him to track down XBMC purchases. You will get the same discount as any other default codes.

Conclusion

Hopefully this write-up will help those building either their first htpcs or those growing frustrated with other remote control options.

If you have any questions about Flirc, there is a forum dedicated to it. Post any requests, problems, or thanks there for friendly help (i’m Chris! on the forums there).

Finally I would like to say thank you to everyone at XBMC especially the developers (apps, skins, plugins and programs). You really are awesome.

Thanks for the report Chris! And once again, if you have an interesting project that you believe makes XBMC better, and you’d like to highlight it, don’t hesitate to contact me at natethomas in the forums.

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  • Jackson

    Awesome, thanks for the review. I just picked one up. I use a simple apple remote in my bedroom, but in the family room I think everyone would appreciate the ability to use a normal remote on the tv. This looks like a fun, simple way to accomplish what IR on a computer (Linux, OS X and Windows!)

    Cheers

  • JustinSane

    Does this mean then that I could pick up any old remote and use it as XBMC remote? like for example the old ps2 dvd remote, or an old dvd player remote?

  • https://plus.google.com/111375213934404408615 natethomas

    I believe that’s the case JustinSane. So long as it’s an IR remote that hangs around the standard frequencies.

  • Josh

    This looks awesome, where can I get one?

  • bossanov808

    Just a note – I have two of these. I don’t actually use them much as I have long since pimped my lirc/keymap.xml/hamrony setup but for quick testing and setting up new systems etc, they are super simple and Jason, who designs and makes them, is a really responsive guy.

    I personally think it’s the almost perfect project (although open source would make it even better again!!)
    - Small, responsive ‘team’ (one guy and some forum helpers really)
    - Very sensible, simple robust design
    - Works with all sorts of old hardware you can re-purpose
    - Very reasonable cost + ships OS easily
    - Solves a very common problem elegantly
    - Proceeds go to cancer research

    As eskro would say – flirc FTW!!!!!!

  • Pedram

    From what I can tell, this just lets me use my TV remote to send keyboard presses to XBMC.

    This is what I already have with my MCE remote and IR Server Suite (without the need for a separate USB adapter), so besides letting me use my TV remote (or whatever other remote besides my MCE one), does this give me any other extra functionality?

  • http://trac.xbmc.org/roadmap Harley

    Does Flirc software and drivers have ARM support so that it can be used on devices such as Raspberry Pi and Pandaboard?

  • guyonphone

    JustinSane :
    Does this mean then that I could pick up any old remote and use it as XBMC remote? like for example the old ps2 dvd remote, or an old dvd player remote?

    I thought the same thing as well, this is a really cool device, since I really wanted to get a USB-CEC adapter, but found my TV doesn’t support it. Thanks for the write-up I totally picked one up.

  • jrl

    @Harley
    Yes, as long as your usb port does support a usb keyboard. This thing just emulates a usb keyboard. You will have to program it on your Windows or MAC pc before though.

  • mark

    Can i get this to run configured on boot, or do i have to load the Flirc config every time?

  • http://flirc.tv Jason Kotzin

    @Harley

    Hey Harley, I’m the creator. You can run the pairing software from another machine, then plug in flirc to the embedded arm, and it will work out of the box with your previously paired remote. No additional software needed since the device is recognized as a USB keyboard. I will eventually have a direct port for arm so you can do the pairing directly on that system. I am also waiting to hear back from the Raspberry Pi folks to see if we could collaborate on something.

  • MrYuuZA

    Great review, thanks as i just started getting into the HTPC side of things and was looking for a solution :) .

    Can you tell me how i can get a few of these in South Africa??

    Regards,

  • MrYuuZA

    @MrYuuZA
    Heh i see shipping is allowed to S.A , ignore above comment regarding how to get it here :) .

  • http://www.vwd.co.za Francois Botha

    I assume it uses keyboard.xml for the mapping and not remote.xml? I have a similar remote, the iSonic IS-RC1 ( http://www.isonic.co.za/tvtuners.htm ), which also emulates a keyboard. The problem is that DO sometimes use my keyboard, and the mapping I’d like to set for my remote conflicted for some keys with my existing keyboard mapping. There are workarounds, but it’s something to keep in mind before buying.

  • Chris

    @Francois Botha yep should use keyboard.XML as it appears to the computer as a USB keyboard

    @Josh: can buy them.online through their website flirc.tv, remember to use the discount code mentioned in the article.

    @Justinsane: what nate said, nearly all remotes are supported as they fall within the standard frequency. At the moment only problematic ones seem to be Xbox and mce (I.e. Microsoft remotes) as they toggle between frequencies or something.

  • http://www.xbmcnerds.com donabi

    I’ve just ordered from Germany.
    With shipping it’s about 29€.
    Still O.K. for such a clever idea.

  • Joey

    “Flirc is even supported on the Xbox 360 after previously being paired with a computer running Windows, Linux, or OSX.”

    Haha, that makes me wonder if that statement here will not make more people ask about XBMC support on Xbox 360 :P

    By the way, this news article is not split into sections properly which makes it take up the whole front page on xbmc.org

  • Enric Godes

    It’s a great idea and costs nothing. I just have bought one, waiting to get it!

  • https://plus.google.com/111375213934404408615 natethomas

    @Joey
    Whoops! Good catch, Joey. It’s really ridiculous how many times I make that mistake. Fixed now.

  • Flo

    If you already have any IR-receiver at all in your HTPC, why not just use EventGhost? It can take any remote infrared signal and map any commands to it (not only keystrokes, but also full batches of nearly any OS command). Sounds much more flexible to me.

  • zag

    Real shame it does not work with MCE remotes but a great idea and great implementation.

    Will be really interesting if you get a version working with the raspberry pi.

  • Chris

    Should work with the raspberry pi, as I assume it supports USB keyboards.

  • Chris

    @JezR – ha ha!

  • stepeters

    bought a flirc a while ago after reading about it on the xbmc forum.

    great device, works perfectly with my xbmc live installation :)

  • RBaxter

    I’ve been using FLIRC on my XBMC build for the past 4 months and absolutely love it. I love it’s portability. When I get my Raspberry Pi, FLIRC will hopefully allow me to make a smooth transition and achieve a quick wife acceptance. Love that Jason K commented on here, keep up the good work man.

  • http://jrfom.com/ James Sumners

    I’ve been putting off upgrading my XBMC machine for months because the newer usbmce drivers don’t recognize my receiver correctly (some weird bug), and I haven’t had time to “fix” them. This thing is exactly what I need.

    I have ordered one, but in my eagerness I overlooked the “XBMC” code. So just add (at least) 1 to the total XBMC orders.

  • Neil

    I already have an USB-IR adaptor. Can I use that with XBMC – specifically the stand-alone OS version?

  • http://jrfom.com/ James Sumners

    Flo :
    If you already have any IR-receiver at all in your HTPC, why not just use EventGhost? It can take any remote infrared signal and map any commands to it (not only keystrokes, but also full batches of nearly any OS command). Sounds much more flexible to me.

    @Flo , Because not all receivers are supported very well. For example, my receivers, an MCE receiver, works quite well with the old usbmce drivers (pre-inclusion into the kernel distribution) but not at all with the new versions. It is _supposed_ to work, but for some reason it doesn’t transmit any input codes; it only gets recognized as being attached.

    Sure, I could sit down some weekend and patch the drivers, once I figure out what the problem is, but this is a helluva lot easier.

  • Andy D

    Will this wake a computer? I would imagine it would since it’s treated as a keyboard. I have a USB-UIRT and use it with EventGhost. While I have 0 issues with the setup while the PC is active, it’s always been problematic with waking the system. I finally gave up. I would gladly pay $25 to get something as small as this solution if it also capable of waking my HTPC

  • Dan

    Good idea! Though I am not a fan of middle-ware (one of the reasons I run linux xbmc), this product seems like VERY nice solution to those with remote control programming/support issues for not only XBMC but any software that have greater support for keyboards (which is most of them).

    Now I am not a user or expert on this product but from the description and comments it works like this:

    1. You are not programming the remote, but the usb receiver itself. It contains the software needed to make the IR to Keystroke translation. The usb device functions as a generic keyboard, thus most devices will recognize and support its keystroke output.

    2. Once you program the USB FLIRC you can literally plug it into any device that supports usb keyboards and it will convert the ir signals to output the keystrokes you programmed for each remote button. No software on the machine required (unless you need to program).

    Awesome middle-ware I must say, makes things pretty easy I assume.

    I guess the question I would have immediately is how robust are the options, can you set repeat delays, timers etc to fine tune the ir input to keystroke output translation for smooth operation on any device/software?

  • Riffmaker

    I bought one awhile back. Best investment I’ve ever made. Really really simple to use. I do wish the usb stick was micro size as it sticks out on my small nettop like a sore thumb, but it works great.

    Flirc +1

  • Andy

    Will this wake my system from sleep? Since it’s treated as a keyboard. I have a USB-UIRT and it’s quite problematic to set it up for waking my system.

  • Chris

    Hi guys. A lot of these questions are great and we’ll gladly and humbly answer them. I think their better asked at forum.flirc.TV as they’ll be answered in different threads so more organised and other users can benefit from your questions.

    Cheers
    Chris!

  • jaccoh

    Might be me. But I dont get it. With my MCE remote (back in the days) I trained lirc to see other remotes as well…? Whats new here?

  • jaccoh

    @jaccoh
    Nevermind.. i see now.

  • Tom

    @Flo

    EventGhost is fine if you run xbmc through Windows, not an option if you use OpenElec or XBMCBuntu though.

    This sounds really nice, I’m tempted to get a couple. If I have a remote that already works somewhat with OpenElec would having FLIRC cause conflicts as XBMC would be receiving a keystroke and a remote press from one button?

    I guess I’d have to delete remote.xml or something?

    • https://plus.google.com/111375213934404408615 natethomas

      Could you just unplug the other IR receiver?

  • Eze

    I bought two 6 months ago, they are great, I use an old dvd player remote that works well, and a harmony remote for the parents – works well with openelec too.

  • notdave

    @Jason Kotzin
    I would love to see a version of this with a line level IR input (not just an IR receiver).

    Those of us with RF setups (or IR distribution hardware) common to Harmony remote (and others) have 3.5mm (and 2.5mm) mono jacks to directly ‘hardwire’ IR signals instead of relying on line of sight. The inclusion of this (or the option to replace the receiver) could increase sales considering the large user base who own Harmony remotes with this functionality. I would never go back to the line of sight requirement.

    One stop-gap solution for us would be to cut the end of an IR blaster and tape it to the receiver, but would much prefer a direct connection, like those found on the back of AVRs and other devices suited for distribution/automation.

    Please consider this, I’d buy one.

  • Tom

    @natethomas
    Haha good point. I should have mentioned its a built in ir receiver.
    I’m sure it can either be disconnected internally or something teamed so xbmc ignores the remote.

    Bought 2 anyway, hope they don’t take too long to get to the UK!

  • manx

    i’m currently using a harmony remote (set up with mce keyboard profile to send keystrokes ) + mce usb ir receiver + xbmc keyboard.xml to map the ir signals to keyboard strokes. if i understood it correctly, the flirc solution does sort of the same, or am i wrong?! so, would flirc bring any benfit to me here? thanks!

  • publicENEMY

    I did told in the forum that MCE REMOTE DOES WORK. I HAVE ONE AND IT WORKS. the only special thing one should do with mce remote is to map the same button twice in a row as mce remote sends alternating signal.

    get the fact right. MCE REMOTE WORKS.

  • wocis

    @Harley
    Looks like the flirc act to pc as standard usb HID device – so i think that every device/pc/whatever which accept on usb standard HID should work.. so rPi arm too.

  • RGamble

    Ordered one yesterday. At $25 shipped, you can’t go wrong.

    I could see how this plus the USB-CEC adapter could get me everything I want: the ability to control my TV, DISH box, Receiver and XBMC box all from the DISH remote (via FLIRC), and automatically power on the TV and switch HDMI inputs when using XBMC (via USB-CEC). My setup is still in the “beta lab” right now (my basement office), and won’t be deployed to the living room until it is as easy as possible for the family to use.

    Can’t wait!

  • Cami

    I’v had this a while. Never got it set up properly so just sitting there. I got it hoping it would eliminate the delay that i experience with Logitech Harmony remotes. It didn’t, it performed the same as my cheap receiver.

    Also was hoping it would wake the computer from sleep which it also couldn’t do.

    I do plan to try setting it up again.

  • Chris

    I have had one of these since it was in beta. Jason provides great support if you need it. I had some problems with hardware on the first early Flirc I got, and after many emails back and forth and new firmware, Jason sent me a replacement device at no cost. Not a problem since.

    It does really work with any remote. Personally I use the AV1 setting of my Directv remote. I told the remote that AV1 was controlling a second Directv tuner and that gave me access to ALL the buttons on the remote! More than I need.

    Also you can set the Flirc to send key combos. So, in Windows for instance, You could create a shortcut to something, assign a key combo to it, then trigger it with a button on your remote! or use built in key combos like ALT+ENTER to move in and out of full screen mode.
    For the price, I highly recommend everyone get one to try/play with.

  • ChrisV

    Chris :
    I have had one of these since it was in beta. Jason provides great support if you need it. I had some problems with hardware on the first early Flirc I got, and after many emails back and forth and new firmware, Jason sent me a replacement device at no cost. Not a problem since.
    It does really work with any remote. Personally I use the AV1 setting of my Directv remote. I told the remote that AV1 was controlling a second Directv tuner and that gave me access to ALL the buttons on the remote! More than I need.
    Also you can set the Flirc to send key combos. So, in Windows for instance, You could create a shortcut to something, assign a key combo to it, then trigger it with a button on your remote! or use built in key combos like ALT+ENTER to move in and out of full screen mode.
    For the price, I highly recommend everyone get one to try/play with.

    Sorry, I wrote the comment above. I am NOT the Chris that wrote the original review. I wasn’t paying attention. Please change my name to ChrisV

  • Westy

    mark :
    Can i get this to run configured on boot, or do i have to load the Flirc config every time?

    I would like to know this also…

  • Alex

    The thing I liked is that Jason responds personally, and quickly to questions – well done Jason! This sounds ideal for me – I am looking at a project with 5+ new XBMC clients and I want to be able to use generic remotes here in Brazil, and not depend on importing MCE clones from eBay in Europe (or having friends and family bring them in). Looks like a good product, well thought out, and run by a good company.

  • [Tahini]

    Am I the only one here who’s pretty content with the official XBMC remote app for Android?
    I can basically control everything with it, without having to have a dedicated remote. When I want to only listen to music I dont even need to turn on the tv: I power on the HTPC through the app and the A/V receiver with its remote (dont have a USB-CEC yet). I then use the app for selection and plaback. Or am I missing some feature I am not aware of?

  • Maddnezz

    I’m going to have to read this again, with “Lionel Richie – Hello” playing in the background, cause yes…this is exactly what I’ve been looking for.

  • Andre

    Sounds like a good alternative or addition to HDMI-CEC!

    But I’m confused now. Let’s say I have a TV, a XBMC box, and my TVs remote to controll both.
    If I now press a button, what happens? I guess the TV would react to it, and the XBMC box too.
    But wouldn’t that be kinda…. stupid?

    Or am I missing something? Is this solution maybe NOT intended to controll TV+XBMC with just ONE normal remote?
    So that you either have to use 2 remotes, or a programmable one like the harmony?
    Still a cool product though! Might have some other use for it, due to its flexible design/versatatallity/compatibility.

    Thanks in advance for claification! :-)

  • http://- Cliff

    I wonder the same thing as Andre..

  • Chris

    @Andre the way I see it there is three situations you could use it for
    1) If you already had an old remote lying around and want to use that to control xbmc

    2) you want it for a harmony remote (read: multi remote)

    3) if you want to use your TV remote buttons that wouldn’t nessisarly interefer with, Tv function most of the time. E.g. left and right only work when the TV is in a menu of some kind leaving it free for xbmc

  • Chris

    @westy. It will work at boot as it appears as a USB keyboard. You only need to use the software once to set it up – then you can transfer it between computers without installing software and it will work.

  • http://flirc.tv Jason Kotzin

    = )

    I didn’t even realize I did that.
    @JezR

  • http://flirc.tv Jason Kotzin

    @Andre

    Some TV’s ignore a lot of the buttons on your remote, like navigation when on the HDMI input. In this case it wouldn’t be a problem. My second television set, Samsung, didn’t like that, and kept saying “unsupported”, or something as equally stupid and annoying. On my harmony, I just set up a bunch of devices and mapped them however I wanted and to which ever buttons I wanted since the IR signal will later be mapped to the correct function on the computer. Hope that makes sense.

  • http://flirc.tv Jason Kotzin

    I am considering, I’ve gotten this question before, so maybe I’ll make the second revision of hardware capable of being extended. Or just make another enclosure.

    @notdave

  • http://flirc.tv Jason Kotzin

    Thanks so much for the kind words. All these great comments make all the hard work worth it.

    @Alex

  • http://flirc.tv Jason Kotzin

    I am working extremely hard on this. The short answer is yes, it certainly will, but the success may vary from user to user. But that is currently the highest priority and in development. I’ll figure it out. You can see the progress being made here:

    http://forum.flirc.tv/index.php?/forum/32-wake-up-command/

    Users are giving me great feedback and the latest release is pretty promising.

    @Andy

  • rocker2344

    @Andre
    i guess if you had one of those annoying remotes given to you cable/satlite provider, you could switch to aux or the extra option (because i only use the box/tv and my android for the xbmc)
    then while in aux you program the remote, thus a xbmc remote!

  • Madaero

    no he did mention what you need to do say your tv is a samsung. and the remote is for samsung. what you need to do is set the remote code for a dvd player for a sony tv so the samsung tv and the sony tv signals are differant but the Flirc turns the signal of the sony to the commands that you program for it i.e. XBMC Key commands. well this is how i take it anyway.

  • X DoKToR

    Please support Jason’s work and at the same time help save lives!!!
    Ordered to UK as soon as i saw a this post for a new-lution for the ‘lovable’ lirc :-)
    Will post a review when Jason gets more parts ! haha

    DOK

  • Romain

    @Andre
    I was thinking the same thing, I can’t see how Flirc would be able to prevent the TV from catching the remote IR signals…

    I guess to use the TV remote for controlling xbmc, the pulse eight cec adapter would be the right choice then ?
    http://xbmc.org/natethomas/2011/11/01/the-usb-cec-adapter-is-a-look-into-the-future/

  • Andre

    Thanks for the answers everyone!

    I have a Panasonic TX-P46GW20 with this remote:
    http://img1.hifi-regler.biz/pictures/prodpics/zusatz/z-panasonic-fb-gw-serie.jpg

    @Chris and Jason:
    Hmm, that could work. I just checked it. When the TV is displaying a HDMI source, at least the d-pad, ok button, number buttons and some others have no function. The TV LED doesn’t even blink in this case. So controlling XBMC should work I guess. And I could still switch the TV on an off.

    @Rocker:
    Not sure if I got you right. Do you mean that some remotes can be switched between “controll the TV” and “controll some other device” by a little switch/button? My TV remote can do this, but it only affects those blue play, pause, >>, << buttons. Not enough to controll XBMC (comfortably). But for remotes that can also switch at least the d-pad and ok button, this is a very nice solution!

    @Romain:
    See above. It seems most(?) TVs don't care for most remote signals while displaying a HDMI source (e.g. your XBMC box). Now that I think about it, that makes total sense.
    Alternatively of course you could just block the TVs IR receiver with some black tape or a center speaker, if available. But then you can't switch the TV on/off via remote anymore.

    Overall I still lean towards a HDMI-CEC solution. But from what I've heard its a tricky thing. So if the Raspberry Pi (without pulse eight), my sourround receiver and my TV don't get along perfectly, this seems a good alternative. …Or if not all needed buttons can be mapped via CEC. The manufacturers CEC implementations are often lacking, I've heard.

  • http://www.hometheatherhifi.com Kieran

    I’ve been thinking about the Pulse8 USB-CEC and FLIRC question a lot. I really don’t think that anyone would want both of them on the same system, unless you planned on using a separate remote for the FLIRC than the rest of your HT. The CEC adapter allows you to operate multiple HDMI-connected devices with the same remote (e.g. your TV remote) but functionality is usually limited (e.g. you don’t get all the functionality of your A/V receiver’s remote when using your TV remote to operate your AVR via CEC.)

    The FLIRC on the other hand, offers you FULL customization of a remote for an HTPC, as every single button can be programed to a keyboard key-stroke.

    I suppose you could have the FLIRC as your “main” interface with your HTPC (similar to your AVR’s original remote) and then still use your TV’s remote via CEC to get basic functionality over your xbmc box via CEC/HDMI. Personally that would drive me nuts.

  • http://linge-ma.ws Znuff

    Keep in mind that this solution is, unfortunately, not suitable for a computer that is used on a daily basis and you just run XBMC on a secondary display (which is currently my case), as the key presses will be sent to your active application instead of XBMC.

  • notdave

    @Znuff
    Why would you be pressing buttons on your IR remote meant for XBMC control while using the PC for something other than XBMC?

  • Cheule

    I just bought one and got the shipping confirmation, thanks Jason!

    Looking forward to trying this new-fangled technology out :)

  • Stefan

    HI, I´m wondering if it will be possible to use FLIRC with an Apple Remote (2nd Gen) and XBMC on a Windows machine!?

  • Chris!